From hard work to Heartwork

As I was faced with Chronic fatigue, I felt a need to express myself; to help raise awareness in highly sensitive people (particularly, but not exclusively, girls/women) on how to protect our precious energy by staying in touch and in tune with the whole rainbow of emotions, processing and (preferably) expressing them instead of suppressing. Truly honoring the language of our body by tuning in and allowing its sensations and subtle signals to inform healthy boundary-setting and our overall choices in life.

I’ve never, to my recollection, had an imaginary friend, but I’ve certainly felt all the feelings Maria is grappling with! Although my book is fictitious, it is inspired by my own life journey; personal experiences of molding or pushing myself to adapt to outer demands, which over time produced resentment and, in the end, exhaustion. I also know my little protagonist’s anxious alertness well, a deep-rooted fear of not being enough, falling short, or that her introversion and sensitivity makes her inferior. Proving myself worthy almost always meant going against my innate traits in some way: overruling my true nature.

In western culture working hard, striving and pushing through are still viewed as chief virtues: the (rather masculine) ideals to respect and reward, although other, softer values have been emerging these last years and especially after COVID19 came along. Personally, I am now replacing – admittedly partly forced to through my condition – hard work with “Heartwork”: a vocation close to my heart, that feels effortless, meaningful and fulfilling. Only wish I’d been able to do it sooner and without the agony…

What I absolutely love about being an intuitive writer is bringing something from the intangible realms into being; to watch the story slowly taking shape through me and finally be born: fully fleshed and in a form often different – and much better – than my initial idea or outline. To experience how this creative and mysterious process unfolds when allowed necessary time and space is nothing short of magnificent!

But apart from enjoying the writing process, it’s my big wish that reading the novel might prevent some young sensitives from having to go through similar painful conditions. Maybe it can nip those self-destructive patterns and behaviors we sensitives often develop in this western “climate” in the bud and thus spare someone such a sneaky illness later in life.